Week 3 NURS 6053 DBQ Student Response #2

Week 3 NURS 6053 DBQ Student Response #2.

I need help with a Nursing question. All explanations and answers will be used to help me learn.

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Student #2 Response

STUDENT # 2 Respond to students post

2 Paragraphs

4-5 Sentences each

2 references

The global pandemic brought about numerous competing issues affecting organizations here and around the world. This stressor led to increased unemployment, shortages in required personal protective equipment, and bankruptcy. More than 30 million adults in the United States have filed for unemployment benefits, suggesting a national unemployment rate rivaled only by that of the Great Depression. Moreover, economists project an impending global recession that will significantly contract the economies of many countries and place numerous industries at risk (Crayne, 2020, p.1).

Undoubtedly, competing needs does influence policies in different ramifications, as it tends to be a means to de-escalate a situation faced by an organization. The most recent competing needs experienced all over America was a shortage of personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Limited access to supplies such as gloves, medical masks, respirators, goggles, face shields, gowns, and aprons expose doctors, nurses, and other frontline workers to infection from COVID-19 and other diseases (World health organization, 98(4), p. 235).

These shortages led to multiple policy changes to accommodate dire needs for personal protective equipment. A single-use of personal protective equipment was revised, which allowed nurses to wear the same gown to care for all confirmed COVID-19 positive cases and was only required to wash hands and change gloves between patients. The plastic gowns were substituted for a reusable soft fabric gown that could be washed and disinfected daily.

Furthermore, the organization changed the N95 mask policy from a single-use to a multiple-use citing; it follows the Center for disease control guidelines. The management team implemented a means to clean the mask up to 10 times via ultraviolet light disinfectant and sterilization process. Disinfected masks could only be discarded if visibly soiled. The CAVI wipes and other disinfectants were essential commodities and locked in a room accessible to the charge nurse only. Surgical masks, N-95 masks, gowns, were counted by charge nurses at the beginning of a shift and shift change. Hydroxychloroquine was added to the list of medications to be counted as though it was a narcotic.

Moreover, family visitation was limited to just one person in the case of an actively dying patient, while others could say goodbye via video calls or facetime. It was a strict no visitation policy, with a rationale that it helps prevent the spread of COVID 19, whereby limiting the amount of personal protective equipment used by visitors. This stands as one of the most challenging experiences associated with the end of life most of us will ever encounter in our nursing career.

Additionally, demand for critical care nurses skyrocketed, while medical-surgical nurses, PACU nurses, cardiac catheterization lab nurses, operating room nurses could not get work hours due to a rapid decline in surgeries and admissions during the peak of the COVID 19 pandemic. The organization was proactive and recognized the pandemic was short-term and felt compelled to rationalize hours amongst floor nurses so that they could have income. The policy was revised to accommodate the Center for disease control (CDC), guidelines recommendation to “dedicate a trained observer to watch closely and provide coaching for each donning and each doffing procedure to ensure adherence to donning and doffing protocols (Guidance on personal protective equipment (PPE) | Personal protective equipment (PPE) | Public health planners | Ebola (Ebola virus disease) | CDC, 2019).” This policy kept floor nurses at float as they checked-off every staff donning and doffing of personal protective equipment before entering a formal COVID-19 room.

Lastly, managers and leadership were mandated to work from home and agree to a pay cut. Nursing overtime was put on hold and assessed on a need basis as hospitals struggle to pay staff and meet overhead expenditure at the same time. The money-making procedures such as aneurysm repairs, transplant, and elective surgeries were put on hold, leading to a rapid decline in profits.

In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented, and the full impact is yet to come as we practice constant use of surgical masks in communities and social distancing. An adjustment to the new norm of virtual dependence in educational institutions, healthcare, marketing, politics, and practicing faith in religion will be a challenge for most organizations.

References

Crayne, M. P. (2020). The traumatic impact of job loss and job search in the aftermath of

COVID-19. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. https://doi-

org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/tra0000852

Guidance on personal protective equipment (PPE) | Personal protective equipment (PPE) |

Public health planners | Ebola (Ebola virus disease) | CDC. (2019, April 15). Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention.

https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/healthcare-us/ppe/guidance.html

Shortage of personal protective equipment endangers health workers. (2020). Bulletin of the

World Health Organization, 98(4), 235.

https://doiorg.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.2471/BLT….

The global pandemic brought about numerous competing issues affecting organizations here and around the world. This stressor led to increased unemployment, shortages in required personal protective equipment, and bankruptcy. More than 30 million adults in the United States have filed for unemployment benefits, suggesting a national unemployment rate rivaled only by that of the Great Depression. Moreover, economists project an impending global recession that will significantly contract the economies of many countries and place numerous industries at risk (Crayne, 2020, p.1).

Undoubtedly, competing needs does influence policies in different ramifications, as it tends to be a means to de-escalate a situation faced by an organization. The most recent competing needs experienced all over America was a shortage of personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Limited access to supplies such as gloves, medical masks, respirators, goggles, face shields, gowns, and aprons expose doctors, nurses, and other frontline workers to infection from COVID-19 and other diseases (World health organization, 98(4), p. 235).

These shortages led to multiple policy changes to accommodate dire needs for personal protective equipment. A single-use of personal protective equipment was revised, which allowed nurses to wear the same gown to care for all confirmed COVID-19 positive cases and was only required to wash hands and change gloves between patients. The plastic gowns were substituted for a reusable soft fabric gown that could be washed and disinfected daily.

Furthermore, the organization changed the N95 mask policy from a single-use to a multiple-use citing; it follows the Center for disease control guidelines. The management team implemented a means to clean the mask up to 10 times via ultraviolet light disinfectant and sterilization process. Disinfected masks could only be discarded if visibly soiled. The CAVI wipes and other disinfectants were essential commodities and locked in a room accessible to the charge nurse only. Surgical masks, N-95 masks, gowns, were counted by charge nurses at the beginning of a shift and shift change. Hydroxychloroquine was added to the list of medications to be counted as though it was a narcotic.

Moreover, family visitation was limited to just one person in the case of an actively dying patient, while others could say goodbye via video calls or facetime. It was a strict no visitation policy, with a rationale that it helps prevent the spread of COVID 19, whereby limiting the amount of personal protective equipment used by visitors. This stands as one of the most challenging experiences associated with the end of life most of us will ever encounter in our nursing career.

Additionally, demand for critical care nurses skyrocketed, while medical-surgical nurses, PACU nurses, cardiac catheterization lab nurses, operating room nurses could not get work hours due to a rapid decline in surgeries and admissions during the peak of the COVID 19 pandemic. The organization was proactive and recognized the pandemic was short-term and felt compelled to rationalize hours amongst floor nurses so that they could have income. The policy was revised to accommodate the Center for disease control (CDC), guidelines recommendation to “dedicate a trained observer to watch closely and provide coaching for each donning and each doffing procedure to ensure adherence to donning and doffing protocols (Guidance on personal protective equipment (PPE) | Personal protective equipment (PPE) | Public health planners | Ebola (Ebola virus disease) | CDC, 2019).” This policy kept floor nurses at float as they checked-off every staff donning and doffing of personal protective equipment before entering a formal COVID-19 room.

Lastly, managers and leadership were mandated to work from home and agree to a pay cut. Nursing overtime was put on hold and assessed on a need basis as hospitals struggle to pay staff and meet overhead expenditure at the same time. The money-making procedures such as aneurysm repairs, transplant, and elective surgeries were put on hold, leading to a rapid decline in profits.

In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented, and the full impact is yet to come as we practice constant use of surgical masks in communities and social distancing. An adjustment to the new norm of virtual dependence in educational institutions, healthcare, marketing, politics, and practicing faith in religion will be a challenge for most organizations.

References

Crayne, M. P. (2020). The traumatic impact of job loss and job search in the aftermath of

COVID-19. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. https://doi-

org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/tra0000852

Guidance on personal protective equipment (PPE) | Personal protective equipment (PPE) |

Public health planners | Ebola (Ebola virus disease) | CDC. (2019, April 15). Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention.

https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/healthcare-us/ppe/guidance.html

Shortage of personal protective equipment endangers health workers. (2020). Bulletin of the

World Health Organization, 98(4), 235.

https://doiorg.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.2471/BLT….

Week 3 NURS 6053 DBQ Student Response #2

Week 3 NURS 6053 DBQ Student Response #2

I need help with a Nursing question. All explanations and answers will be used to help me learn.

Student #2 Response

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

Order Paper Now

STUDENT # 2 Respond to students post

2 Paragraphs

4-5 Sentences each

2 references

The global pandemic brought about numerous competing issues affecting organizations here and around the world. This stressor led to increased unemployment, shortages in required personal protective equipment, and bankruptcy. More than 30 million adults in the United States have filed for unemployment benefits, suggesting a national unemployment rate rivaled only by that of the Great Depression. Moreover, economists project an impending global recession that will significantly contract the economies of many countries and place numerous industries at risk (Crayne, 2020, p.1).

Undoubtedly, competing needs does influence policies in different ramifications, as it tends to be a means to de-escalate a situation faced by an organization. The most recent competing needs experienced all over America was a shortage of personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Limited access to supplies such as gloves, medical masks, respirators, goggles, face shields, gowns, and aprons expose doctors, nurses, and other frontline workers to infection from COVID-19 and other diseases (World health organization, 98(4), p. 235).

These shortages led to multiple policy changes to accommodate dire needs for personal protective equipment. A single-use of personal protective equipment was revised, which allowed nurses to wear the same gown to care for all confirmed COVID-19 positive cases and was only required to wash hands and change gloves between patients. The plastic gowns were substituted for a reusable soft fabric gown that could be washed and disinfected daily.

Furthermore, the organization changed the N95 mask policy from a single-use to a multiple-use citing; it follows the Center for disease control guidelines. The management team implemented a means to clean the mask up to 10 times via ultraviolet light disinfectant and sterilization process. Disinfected masks could only be discarded if visibly soiled. The CAVI wipes and other disinfectants were essential commodities and locked in a room accessible to the charge nurse only. Surgical masks, N-95 masks, gowns, were counted by charge nurses at the beginning of a shift and shift change. Hydroxychloroquine was added to the list of medications to be counted as though it was a narcotic.

Moreover, family visitation was limited to just one person in the case of an actively dying patient, while others could say goodbye via video calls or facetime. It was a strict no visitation policy, with a rationale that it helps prevent the spread of COVID 19, whereby limiting the amount of personal protective equipment used by visitors. This stands as one of the most challenging experiences associated with the end of life most of us will ever encounter in our nursing career.

Additionally, demand for critical care nurses skyrocketed, while medical-surgical nurses, PACU nurses, cardiac catheterization lab nurses, operating room nurses could not get work hours due to a rapid decline in surgeries and admissions during the peak of the COVID 19 pandemic. The organization was proactive and recognized the pandemic was short-term and felt compelled to rationalize hours amongst floor nurses so that they could have income. The policy was revised to accommodate the Center for disease control (CDC), guidelines recommendation to “dedicate a trained observer to watch closely and provide coaching for each donning and each doffing procedure to ensure adherence to donning and doffing protocols (Guidance on personal protective equipment (PPE) | Personal protective equipment (PPE) | Public health planners | Ebola (Ebola virus disease) | CDC, 2019).” This policy kept floor nurses at float as they checked-off every staff donning and doffing of personal protective equipment before entering a formal COVID-19 room.

Lastly, managers and leadership were mandated to work from home and agree to a pay cut. Nursing overtime was put on hold and assessed on a need basis as hospitals struggle to pay staff and meet overhead expenditure at the same time. The money-making procedures such as aneurysm repairs, transplant, and elective surgeries were put on hold, leading to a rapid decline in profits.

In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented, and the full impact is yet to come as we practice constant use of surgical masks in communities and social distancing. An adjustment to the new norm of virtual dependence in educational institutions, healthcare, marketing, politics, and practicing faith in religion will be a challenge for most organizations.

References

Crayne, M. P. (2020). The traumatic impact of job loss and job search in the aftermath of

COVID-19. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. https://doi-

org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/tra0000852

Guidance on personal protective equipment (PPE) | Personal protective equipment (PPE) |

Public health planners | Ebola (Ebola virus disease) | CDC. (2019, April 15). Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention.

https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/healthcare-us/ppe/guidance.html

Shortage of personal protective equipment endangers health workers. (2020). Bulletin of the

World Health Organization, 98(4), 235.

https://doiorg.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.2471/BLT….

The global pandemic brought about numerous competing issues affecting organizations here and around the world. This stressor led to increased unemployment, shortages in required personal protective equipment, and bankruptcy. More than 30 million adults in the United States have filed for unemployment benefits, suggesting a national unemployment rate rivaled only by that of the Great Depression. Moreover, economists project an impending global recession that will significantly contract the economies of many countries and place numerous industries at risk (Crayne, 2020, p.1).

Undoubtedly, competing needs does influence policies in different ramifications, as it tends to be a means to de-escalate a situation faced by an organization. The most recent competing needs experienced all over America was a shortage of personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Limited access to supplies such as gloves, medical masks, respirators, goggles, face shields, gowns, and aprons expose doctors, nurses, and other frontline workers to infection from COVID-19 and other diseases (World health organization, 98(4), p. 235).

These shortages led to multiple policy changes to accommodate dire needs for personal protective equipment. A single-use of personal protective equipment was revised, which allowed nurses to wear the same gown to care for all confirmed COVID-19 positive cases and was only required to wash hands and change gloves between patients. The plastic gowns were substituted for a reusable soft fabric gown that could be washed and disinfected daily.

Furthermore, the organization changed the N95 mask policy from a single-use to a multiple-use citing; it follows the Center for disease control guidelines. The management team implemented a means to clean the mask up to 10 times via ultraviolet light disinfectant and sterilization process. Disinfected masks could only be discarded if visibly soiled. The CAVI wipes and other disinfectants were essential commodities and locked in a room accessible to the charge nurse only. Surgical masks, N-95 masks, gowns, were counted by charge nurses at the beginning of a shift and shift change. Hydroxychloroquine was added to the list of medications to be counted as though it was a narcotic.

Moreover, family visitation was limited to just one person in the case of an actively dying patient, while others could say goodbye via video calls or facetime. It was a strict no visitation policy, with a rationale that it helps prevent the spread of COVID 19, whereby limiting the amount of personal protective equipment used by visitors. This stands as one of the most challenging experiences associated with the end of life most of us will ever encounter in our nursing career.

Additionally, demand for critical care nurses skyrocketed, while medical-surgical nurses, PACU nurses, cardiac catheterization lab nurses, operating room nurses could not get work hours due to a rapid decline in surgeries and admissions during the peak of the COVID 19 pandemic. The organization was proactive and recognized the pandemic was short-term and felt compelled to rationalize hours amongst floor nurses so that they could have income. The policy was revised to accommodate the Center for disease control (CDC), guidelines recommendation to “dedicate a trained observer to watch closely and provide coaching for each donning and each doffing procedure to ensure adherence to donning and doffing protocols (Guidance on personal protective equipment (PPE) | Personal protective equipment (PPE) | Public health planners | Ebola (Ebola virus disease) | CDC, 2019).” This policy kept floor nurses at float as they checked-off every staff donning and doffing of personal protective equipment before entering a formal COVID-19 room.

Lastly, managers and leadership were mandated to work from home and agree to a pay cut. Nursing overtime was put on hold and assessed on a need basis as hospitals struggle to pay staff and meet overhead expenditure at the same time. The money-making procedures such as aneurysm repairs, transplant, and elective surgeries were put on hold, leading to a rapid decline in profits.

In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented, and the full impact is yet to come as we practice constant use of surgical masks in communities and social distancing. An adjustment to the new norm of virtual dependence in educational institutions, healthcare, marketing, politics, and practicing faith in religion will be a challenge for most organizations.

References

Crayne, M. P. (2020). The traumatic impact of job loss and job search in the aftermath of

COVID-19. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. https://doi-

org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/tra0000852

Guidance on personal protective equipment (PPE) | Personal protective equipment (PPE) |

Public health planners | Ebola (Ebola virus disease) | CDC. (2019, April 15). Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention.

https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/healthcare-us/ppe/guidance.html

Shortage of personal protective equipment endangers health workers. (2020). Bulletin of the

World Health Organization, 98(4), 235.

https://doiorg.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.2471/BLT….